Subscriber Login

Data & Statistics

Western Balkan Six:Installed Capacity, Generation and Consumption [free access]

October 9, 2019

The Western Balkan countries have faced significant energy challenges in the past and some of the member countries are still struggling to meet their electricity demand. The region comprises six European countries, namely, Albania, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Kosovo, Macedonia, Montenegro and Serbia. The Western Balkan 6 (WB6) Initiative (also known as the Berlin process) was launched in 2014 to support the six contracting parties of the Energy Community in southeast Europe.

 

By the end of 2018, WB6 countries had a total installed capacity of 18,778 MW. The installed capacity increased at a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 1.8 per cent from 17,525 MW in 2014. In 2018, Serbia had the maximum share (40 per cent) in the total capacity.

 

By the end of 2018, electricity generation (excluding Albania) stood at about 67,072 GWh, as against a power consumption (excluding Albania) of about 65,490 GWh in 2014. Serbia, with 34,345 GWh, accounted for about 51 per cent of the total electricity generation (excluding Albania) in 2018.

 

The region relies mainly on thermal power plants for meeting electricity demand, followed by hydroelectric power. However, the ratio of thermal and hydro installed capacity varies significantly across countries. Some of the member countries face power shortages due to lower generation capacity leading to energy being imported to meet their electricity demand. All of the Western Balkan countries, except Albania, are successor states of the former Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia. The geographical division of Yugoslavia has also resulted in a mismatch between available generation and transmission and distribution capacities in these countries, leading to a gap between power demand and supply. This situation provides a strong incentive for the region to focus on developing renewable energy, which, in 2018, accounted for only 3 per cent of total installed capacity.

 

Table 1: Growth in WB6’s installed capacity, generation and consumption

Country

Installed capacity

(MW)

Electricity generation

(GWh)

Power consumption

(GWh)

2014

2018

2014

2018

2014

2018

Albania

        1,823

2,204

 6,042

 NA

7,958

 NA

Bosnia and Herzegovina

 4,096

4,462

15,030

17,873

 11,650

13,294

Kosovo1 

1,527

1,564

 4,894

 5,620

 5,574

 5,991

Montenegro2 

 877

 906

 3,038

 3,787

3,290

3,185

North Macedonia

 2,011

2,076

5,374

5,447

8,055

 7,415

Serbia 

 7,190

7,566

31,963

34,345

33,575

35,605

Note: NA - not available

1­–For Kosovo, the 2018 figures for installed capacity, generation and consumption have been estimated based on past CAGR; 2–For North Macedonia, the 2018 figures for installed capacity and consumption have been estimated based on past CAGR.

Source: Enti Rregullator I Energjise, Albania; State Electricity Regulatory Commission, Bosnia and Herzegovina; Energy Regulatory Office, Kosovo; Regulatorna Agencija za Energetiku; Energy Community; Energy Regulatory Commission; Elektromreža Srbije; Global Transmission Research

 

Of the given total capacity in 2018, 51 per cent was thermal-based; 46 per cent was hydro-based; nearly 3 per cent was based on renewable sources; and the remaining was based on industrial power plants. Over the five-year period (2014–18), thermal-based resources have decreased by 6 per cent and hydro and renewable-based resources have increased by 5 per cent and 2 per cent respectively. Serbia was among the first member countries to add renewable sources to its generation mix in 2011.

 

Bosnia and Herzegovina, Montenegro and Serbia are also retiring their old conventional energy-based generation projects. During 2014–18, 337 MW of coal-based capacity was retired in the region. As a result, the total installed generation capacity in the region marked a CAGR of only a little over 1 per cent during 2014–18.

 

Figure 1:  Change in installed capacity generation mix (%) 

https://www.globaltransmission.info/images/FigureGTR1.jpg

Notes: For Albania, Kosovo and Montenegro, the 2018 generation mix has been estimated based on past CAGR.

Source: Enti Rregullator I Energjise, Albania; State Electricity Regulatory Commission, Bosnia and Herzegovina; Energy Regulatory Office, Kosovo; Regulatorna Agencija za Energetiku; Energy Community; Energy Regulatory Commission; Elektromreža Srbije; Global Transmission Research